Category Archives: Speak the Truth

X2theL Interview of God is a Brown Girl Too Author Cecilia B. Loving

AUM for Constant ContactHope you enjoy this slice of food for thought, and interview by Drake Colley, co-creator of X2theL, Neo-Soul.

Rev. Loving shares her vision of absolute good and infinite supply, and journey through God is a Brown Girl Too, Prayers for Those Standing on the Edge of Greatness, God is a Lawyer Too, and what’s next.

TELL A NEW STORY

Psalm 102:2 says “let the redeemed of the Lord tell their story.”

At the 2012 God is a Brown Girl Too Retreat, which was held at the Mariandale Retreat Center in Westchester County, New York, we all did just that.  We told our stories, and the more we told them, the more we realized that the stories that we tell are not based on what we experience but on what we believe.

We realized that we had the power to decree a thing and make it so.  The most powerful thing about the retreat is that the story that I really hoped and prayed would unfold – did unfold:  The words we decreed and the stories that we told when we arrived on Friday, the first day of the retreat, was not the story that we told and the words that we decreed when we departed the last day, the following Sunday.

Each one of us decreed, spoke, claimed — told a new story.

God is a Brown Girl Too teaches us that we have been telling the same stories for so long that we no longer know truth from fiction.  We have no idea who we really are in the Spirit as opposed to who we appear to be in the flesh.   Most times, the person who was abused, neglected, rejected or condemned in the past – is given a starring role while our real selves take a back seat.

The only way that we are going to see ourselves reflected as God’s image and likeness is to free ourselves from the past limitations that we imposed upon ourselves, and tell a new story.  We have to  throw away the regret and the pain and the hurt that has been passing for fulfillment and see ourselves with a new light.

In the book God is a Brown Girl Too, God speaks for the first time as a woman of color to women of color, saying:

You are not who you were yesterday . . . . You are different.  You are reborn.  You are free.  Begin to see yourself with a new light. . . .  Matthew, Chapter 6, Verse 22. . .says that the light of the body is the eye: if therefore your eye is single, your whole body will be full of light.  The light is the wisdom that is providing you with a lens through which you can see all of the experiences that I have given you with a new insight. 

What you see in the flesh is around you, but it is not  you.  Jesus tried to explain this when he said, “I am not of this world” (John 8:23). Spirit is the only thing that matters.  Look only to me.  Seek first my kingdom.  Wait upon me, and I will heal your wounds and allow you to move forward with them as a blessing rather than a hindrance.  When you fail to keep your focus on Spirit, you will find yourselves like that beggar on the roadside – blinded by your lack of faith.  

Without my light, it’s difficult to tell a new story for yourself because you cannot see who you really are.  Spirit is the light that unifies you in consciousness and centers you in peace, clarity, creativity, joy, and abundance. 

Only when you are centered in my light do you realize your oneness with the entire universe.  If you achieve this going forward, you will not be limited the way that you were in the past.  You will realize that the heartache or the pain that you experienced can be released and you can stop re-living it.  You can begin to recreate who you want to be rather than who you used to be.  

One of the Tell a New Story retreat participants, Pamela James, blessed us with a powerful affirmation.  She said, “I AM the Great I AM.”  We are indeed the Great I AM, and the stories that we tell about ourselves should reflect nothing more than that.

In 2013, our Fifth Annual God is a Brown Girl Too Retreat, entitled “Our Hope of Glory” — will be aboard a cruise ship, the Carnival Glory.

It’s our maiden voyage because it’s the first time that we will bring our energy to such a relaxing and wonderful environment.  We know that it will energize us.  We are cruising to Nova Scotia on July 29, 2013, for five days during which we will lift up that profound mantra that Paul inspired when he said, “Christ in you, the hope of glory” (Colossians 1:27).

This is an opportunity like no other to reconnect with the God in us.

You can find more details about the cruise at www.godisabrowngirltoo.webs.com.  But you have to book by July 13, by putting down a deposit as little as $25.00.

Just call Bert Vigueras at CRUISE ONE –(800)619-1694 OR (718) 673-9003.

In the interim, join us for our “Spiritual Boot Camp” for the next seven Sundays, starting June at 2:30 PM, at the Unity Center of New York City, located at 213 West 58th Street, near the Time Warner Building, right off Central Park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE “HELP” OR WHAT WE CAN DO TO HELP OURSELVES By Cecilia B. Loving

I was at a salad bar in New York City recently – that was so trendy there was a line salivating for chopped greens, cheese and chicken that extended down the street.  As I stood in line watching the mating ritual between young blonds and brunettes, I could not help but wonder where the sisters were.  We eat salad.   We take lunch breaks.  But when I looked around Manhattan (not everywhere but as far as the eye could see), I saw very few of us representing the well-heeled corporate work force.

Oh I see more of us in Carroll Gardens cast in leading roles as “The Help” — strolling down Court Street with our noses held high.   Haughtiness is sometimes a coping mechanism for those who have the decent but thankless task of caring for white babies who will likely grow up to remember “the help” while refusing to hire the brown children left to raise themselves.  (I’ve heard one — which was one too many — say that the only thing we can do for them is clean their houses.)

My mother and a good many mothers and grandmothers were “the help,” so that we could get advanced degrees and earn the right to good-paying jobs that gave us the opportunity to contribute the “book sense” education gave us and the “good sense” our parents gave us – informed by the “God-sense” the Holy Spirit gives us.  But when I look around, I see fewer of us in the big city at the big company holding down the big job.  So what happened?

Well The National Women’s Law Center  says more black women lost their jobs than any other segment of society since 2007.  Even during the so-called economic recovery period (2009-2011), the unemployment rate for women actually increased rather than decreased.  Black women, the Women’s Law Center reports, who are at the head of the black workforce and at the head of most black families, continue to lose jobs. At least 475,000 sisters have lost their jobs since 2007 and those are only the ones who had one in the first place.  Few of us went to go work for Oprah.  Even the one who was hired to run OWN (meaning Oprah’s own network – not yours) was kicked to the curb.  Don’t get me wrong, I’m not blaming O for not doing for us what we can do for ourselves.  She’s a living testimony that we have the power to build our own empires.

The surveys indicating no job growth for sisters never give a real perspective as to whether we fell on our behinds, got pushed to the edge or kicked to the curb.  It seems to project the behavior that one white male New York Times writer urges: use the “recession” as an excuse to do what you never had the courage to do in the first place (e.g., fire people you want to get rid of and perhaps never wanted to hire).

But God is a Brown Girl Too is not about what other folks can do to help us.  It teaches that we have the power to help ourselves.  So the challenge this current dilemma blesses us with is figuring out how can we “help” lighten our load, help ease our burden, help enlarge our territory and help step into our greatness.  The question carries within it the assumption that whatever we do for others, we do for ourselves – and vice versa.  I help everybody; it doesn’t matter what your ethnicity is.  But my sisters and brothers are definitely at the top of my list because I know that we need help the most.

This is the first part of a seven-part series on what we can do to “help” ourselves: help us reach our goals, help us recreate ourselves, help us build the empires that we are destined to build.

Put God, Love, Jesus, Yahweh, Allah, Buddha, Krishna, Ra, Divine Mind, Universe, Source — or Whatever You Call the Kingdom Within — FIRST

This is not about semantics.  It’s not even about religion.  There will be different religions as long as there are different personalities.  I don’t argue religion; it’s a losing proposition.  But I do urge us all to realize that we are here to love one another.

If you call yourself a Christian, a Muslim, a Jew, or affiliated with any other faith, you should know that God is Love.  We have to love ourselves because in so doing we realize the presence of love as us, reverberating through every aspect of our being.  We can only be as loving to others as we are to ourselves.

Love is the only thing that will heal every wound, ease every pain, and conquer every enemy.

When we put love first, the universe (love) puts us first and we receive the good that we desire.

This means that we can’t be hard on ourselves.  We have to love every inch and every cell of our beautiful bodies – every delicate hair on our heads.  We have to love our minds and all of its attention to detail and memory.

We have to love our souls and our mission, our purpose here on earth. This sounds more simple than it is.  But if you see, hear or read anything in the media, it does not support our love of  ourselves.  Black women are marginalized or even demonized rather than celebrated.  We are not cast in most television shows or movies.  We are seldom in books.  And most of the images of us are not flattering.  We are usually denigrated as less than, unworthy, lusty, nasty, addicted, assimilated beyond recognition, or just “the help.”

That’s why I love what Toni Morrison said: write the book you want to read.  Tell the story you want to hear.  Make the movie you want to see.  Otherwise, you won’t be starring in it — unless you’re The Help.  (Footnote an exception to this is my all time favorite Halle Berry kicking butt as Catwoman and making love to Benjamin Bratt — I know why some folks didn’t like her strutting her stuff, for the same reason I watch it everytime it comes on — cheering Halle on through every powerful butt-kicking scene.)  We suffer from fibroids and high blood pressure and diabetes and so many other ailments – because society has blatantly kicked us – the “help” to the curb and we are so busy celebrating our starring role that we fail to realize the joke is on us.

We kick ourselves to the curb — repeatedly foresaking our own power rather than embracing ourselves with so much love that our uniform falls off.  We need to love ourselves enough to at least realize we don’t need flat butts or skinny thighs or blond hair to be beautiful.  We were all born as beautiful children of God.

We just need to start loving one another — as well as ourselves without a single ounce of contempt.  There never has been any room for hatred — especially in this so-called enlightened age.

If you don’t love yourself – with all of your imperfections and your hopes and your wish lists, you cannot love your sisters, brothers and all humanity.

[To be continued in Part Two . . .]

FACEBOOK: A CHANNEL OF LOVE, NOT THE LAST STOP By Cecilia B. Loving

Last week, someone “hacked” into my Facebook account.   “Hacking,” a term coined by a group of students at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology),  is the criminal offense of breaking into a communications system.   The victims of hacking range from universities, banks, credit card companies, and even the Department of Defense.  Not only is financial information sought but so is personal data, which is hacked from telephone lines, messaging services, and other communications systems — now even by news agencies.   Step back paparazzi, the news media is now paying hackers a lot more to spy on British royalty, PR firms, soccer stars, and even murder victims — just for a news exclusive.  Cyber burglars have become so sophisticated that they can even trace your computer keystrokes.  Hacking is no longer merely the stuff of a fictional James Bond thriller but has entered the political fray of Parliment debates, Scotland yard inquiries and even arrests of  top media executives (e.g., Rupert Murdoch debacle).

Even though it was not as dramatic, my own experience was also invasive, disruptive and horrific.  Instead of my face, someone else’s face appeared on my page.  In a Facebook world, where your “face” is the spiritual link to your community and your page or “wall” is your voice — not having your face is more than disconcerting.   Instead of me, there was a younger woman — wearing a sly grin, with a flirtatious index finger sticking in her mouth.   It wasn’t me.   Instead of my name, there was someone else’s name.   Even worse, all of my messages suddenly appeared as someone else’s.  Worse of all, they had access to my account, and I didn’t.   The hacker controlled the links to all 4800 of my friends, my 3 business pages and my data.  They also tried to hack my email account.

How do you prevent hacking?  Keep your computer security firewall updated.  Make sure you follow the updates for your computer operating system, which may have been created to close the gaps that a hacker can get through.  Change your password and security settings once a month.  Don’t use the same passwords, especially for related systems.  Make sure that you use a combination of letters, numbers and special characters.  Never close out a program without properly logging out.  Never save your password on your computer — especially on a computer that you do not own and maintain on your premises.   Never, under no condition whatsoever, give information to a request made by a telephone call that was not dialed by you or an email supposedly sent from a financial institution.  (Legitimate businesses don’t email you for passwords, social security numbers or birthdates.)  Never put your birthdate and related personal information on public places like Facebook.   Never put your online banking or credit card purchases or work-related email in the same account as the email account linked to your social media account (e.g., Facebook, Linked-In, Twitter, etc.).  This is not to be taken lightly.  Failure to put up the proper safeguards is like going away on a cruise with the door to your home unlocked.

If you went on a cruise and left your front door at home unlocked, by the time you returned home from the cruise, the chances are great that someone might have invaded your home.   Having an uninvited guest take over your home as their own would be a bit distrurbing to say the least.  You would have to call law enforcement, evict the intruder, sterilize the place, bless it, and probably replace a few things.  And to continue the analogy, when you returned to your “hacked-home,” you would find that the hacker-intruder had changed the locks and you would no longer be able to get into your own house.

I actually had to get friends on Facebook to visit my own page, to post that the page had been hacked and to give me updates on what was going on.   The hacker’s face appeared on all of my previous spiritual messages, throughout which she inserted a few of “her” high heel advertisements.   (I have no idea who the hacker/s were.)   “She” may have even called them “Christian” high heels.   It left a very nasty taste in the mouths of everyone who saw them.  No one will be wearing those shoes if that’s the idea.  Oh, except for a Reverend Somebody: she asked the hacker to post shoes on her page.  But perhaps she was a hacker too — simply saying, “well, I’m in — cause somebody went on a cruise and left their door unlocked.”

Not only was I booted off my page and forced to wait days for Facebook to get to restore my rights.   But I also lost the artificial bloodline to my community, my family, my “Facebook Friends”.  I felt as though a metaphysical artery had been severed.  I could no longer connect with the folks that I had formed a communal bond with — what Buddhists call a sangha of energy and strength and enlightenment.  I could not read Judy’s poetry; hear Clifford’s voice; appreciate Farah’s news; receive Sandi’s fitness counsel; be uplifted by Sherrelle’s success; laugh at Azalia’s antics; whisper to old roommates, evangelists, disciples, and souls stepping off the dge of their greatness.  I could not giggle with whoever was up at 3 AM because they couldn’t get to sleep.  I could not receive my friends’ take on whatever show was airing, hear their prophecy of politics, note their views on health, fashion and determination.  I could not raise our communal prayer of goodness in order to smooth the rough edges of dreams, or even anoint our moment with a summer song — courtesy of You-Tube.

I was gone.  I wasn’t gone by choice.  I had almost evaporated like thin air.  I can’t imagine why anyone whould find their own life so meaningless that they would want to steal my friends and my business and my high school, college, seminary, graduate and law school buddies — my loved ones emerging from the divine ethers embracing me with the space of receptivity over the last 40-50 years — rather than build their own.  Had I missed an opportunity?  Why hadn’t I shared some love on everyone’s page?  Was I like the Prodigal Son — strung out in desolation and despair — trying to find my way home?  Why hadn’t I downloaded all my data from Facebook?  How could I have avoided this Twilight Zone moment — the one where I wander around my own party, approaching friends and attempting to share with them — but no one can see me?  Ouch.

I know that some of you condemn Facebook, but I believe that the people who condemn it are the people who don’t use it.   Facebook is like any other place that is part of our cosmic consciousness —  filled with as much love as you give it.  We always receive what we give.   We are always blessed when we bless others.   So I prayed for my Facebook page to be restored.  I needed to be back.

Spirit spoke to me as well.  The Holy Spirit explained that Facebook isn’t the end; it’s just the beginning.  What really matters is the connections that are made.  Once re-kindled, our friendships remain.   The person that I admired in college from afar was the one who reached out to another at the crack of dawn — who I always felt was the personification of sunshine itself.  And she contacted me to say that something had gone awry on my beloved Facebook page.  Friends in Detroit and New Jersey and DC and California and New York questioned who that was in my house — acting the fool in those high-heeled shoes?  Who, they questioned, was trying to pose as a good vibe when they were no more than a virus?

I always say that “there is a blessing in everything.”  What someone else means for evil, God always means for good.  The good in this instance was that somehow in the midst of being estranged, I was even more connected.  It’s like Harry Potter — when Voldemort attacks, people come together in ways that they never had before.   My friends helped me clean up the place.  They were good and quick and supportive.   It didn’t even matter if they knew me in the flesh, they knew me in the Spirit.  They came forward and sacrificed the sanctity of their own pages to become reunited with me.   I even made lots of new friends and now have two pages.  Most importantly, I have re-connected with the true source of my love for my friends everywhere — in the realization that Facebook is merely a channel for our love, not the last stop.

Facebook is an open door that invites us to come in, listen, remember, and see.  We bring our kindness, our respect and our creativity to this open door that serves as the channel which connects us forever.   We really are here to love one another.  The good thing about Facebook is that it helps uplift that love for free.  You can create your own page.  Like anything else, Facebook takes time, devotion and the power of words.  Speak truth to it.  Plant joy in it.  Dance through it.  Color outside the lines in it.  Paste pictures on  the screen of time and send music through endless channels.  Be love  agents through it.  Support the joy of change.  Rejoice beyond pain.  Find freedom through it.  Have faith in its magic.  Be there for your friends.  By connecting with others, we ultimately connect with ourselves.

Namaste,

Reverend Cecilia Loving

About SPIRITMUV:  Spiritmuv® is a trans-denominational church, which means that it transcends the confines of religion and teaches unconditional love for one another regardless of race, creed, culture, or religion.   At the heart of its teachings is what Jesus taught — that we love one another, as well as the community that Mahatma Gandhi inspired when he said, “I am a Christian and a Muslim and a Hindu and a Jew.”  Reverend Cecilia Loving is the founder and creator of Spiritmuv, which was formed in 2007.  Services are held for an hour every Sunday, from 2:30 P.M. to 3:30 P.M. at the Unity Center of NYC, located at 213 West 58th Street.

Rev. Loving’s new book is now available God is Brown Girl Too, as well as Prayers for Those Standing in the Edge of Greatness.

Copyright 2011 by Cecilia Loving.

None of the content herein may be copied or otherwise used except with Reverend Loving’s written permission.

 

Join the Spiritmuv  Community at www.Spiritmuv.ning.com for special postings by Rev. Loving.

A PRAYER FOR THE HOUSEKEEPER’S MIRACLE By Cecilia B. Loving

When I read news accounts about former International Monetary Fund Head Dominique Strauss-Kahn relaxing in a plush Manhattan apartment after being indicted of seven counts of sexual assault on an African housekeeper at the Sofitel Hotel in New York City, I am reminded of the sins buried in this country’s soil.  We know but seldom speak of the past rapes and sexual assaults upon enslaved Africans by predators not so different from Strauss-Kahn: criminals whose only defense is their own self-aggrandized status.  We watch with sickened dismay as one judge trumps another’s remand of Strauss-Kahn to Rikers and sends the elitist French man home with his wife.  His wife even rented an apartment just for him to wear his ankle bracelet.  With these shenanigans, miracles seem far beyond the grasp of African hotel housekeepers from the Bronx and only within the reach of millionaires who can afford them.  Where are the stats, I wondered, on the frequency with which poor folk are indicted and then sent home to await their fate in the projects.  But then I remembered, Rikers Island is full of accused people who can’t afford the 24-hour watchman, $1 million cash bond or $5 million insurance bond that Strauss-Kahn purchased.

Perhaps the miracle is that law enforcement even managed to pull Strauss-Kahn, who was a potential candidate for the President of France, off Air France two minutes before his plane took off.  He appeared to be fleeing.

Perhaps the miracle is that a judge presided over the initial bail hearing who had the foresight to remand Strauss-Kahn before he escaped to his vacation home in Marrakech.   “Remand” means go to jail.  If she had not sent him there immediately, it is likely that he would not have hung around for an indictment.  He could have lived outside America’s jurisdiction in either France or Morocco.  That means he would have never been tried for the indictment now issued by a Grand Jury.

Perhaps the miracle is that a young woman who managed to escape the horrors of her native Guinea, where rape is widespread, gained asylum in America where she at least has some recourse against attackers.  Perhaps the miracle is that Strauss-Kahn’s DNA was collected swiftly enough to match the samples taken from the hotel housekeeper.

Staring in the face of overwhelming evidence,  Strauss-Kahn’s legal team is counting on the miracle of a consent defense.  But the “she-wanted-it” defense seems preposterous in view of the housekeeper’s steps to report the attack without delay.  Or perhaps it is only preposterous to those of us who seriously doubt that a hard-working woman, a religious woman, a woman single-handedly raising her daughter had the luxury of engaging in Strauss-Kahn’s consensual game.  Supposedly, he had tried, without success, to gain the attention of other hotel staff who apparently – like the victim – rebuffed him.

Perhaps the miracle is that the cry of rape took so long to catch up with Strauss-Kahn who has a reputation of  attacking women.  Apparently, he did not limit his inappropriate attacks to the staffs of hotels.  But his crime, if convicted, would be consistent with the reports of many housekeepers concerning the unsavory misconduct of hotel guests.  Only a notorious man could be used to shed light on such a notorious abuse of service.  After all, we’re not just the maid – not just another statistic to add to the abuse of domestic workers worldwide.  Perhaps the miracle is that for now, some semblance of justice prevails.

But we live in a world where common decency depends upon miracles and blatant misconduct can be bought by a good lawyer.  So this is what I am praying for: that good does ultimately triumph, that justice does prevail and that we open our eyes to see the marginalization, denigration and mistreatment of women everywhere.  The miracle that I am praying for is that the housekeeper is able to transform her life completely by moving from victimhood to victory.  She has served so many for so little; it is time that the system serves her.  The miracle that I am praying for is that not only does she win her criminal case but that she wins a civil case against the accused – if he is found guilty.

I pray that all of those who suffer at the hands of racism, sexism, classism and all of the other –isms are vindicated for their suffering.  I pray that we offer our collective consciousness to the deliverance of systematic brutality, violence and abuse of women everywhere.  I pray that we all grow to respect ourselves as the gods that we are and stop limiting ourselves by the confines of second class citizenship that someone else has created.

“Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead,” they say.  “Jesus turned water into wine.  Jesus made the blind see.  Jesus expelled demons from the flesh.  Jesus made the lame walk.  Jesus multiplied fish and bread.”  But Jesus taught us that our ability to experience miracles is commensurate with our faith.  He says again and again, “by your faith you were made whole.”  If we have faith that no one is more blessed than us, or is more gifted than us, or has priority or preference over the miracle that God manifested as us, then every decision we make will bring us closer to the realization that we are our own miracle.   We can then open our eyes and see God for the first time in everything that we say and everything that we do.  We can accept the good right within our midst.  We can be brave enough to do onto others as we would have them do unto us.  We can be extraordinary in the ordinary spaces of our life.  We can open the door and not be dragged by our hair but step into the power of all that we desire to take shape.

Perhaps the miracle is that we actually second-guess God when we know that Spirit loves us and protects us and liberates us from attackers with justice. Each one of us is blessed to carry out a divine purpose – known only to us, etched somewhere in the divine ethers of our soul – patiently waiting for us to manifest – to perform, to be, to do what we are called to demonstrate.  The  Prophet Jeremiah teaches us in the 1st chapter of Jeremiah that God said: “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you; Before you were born I sanctified you; I ordained you a prophet to the nations.”

It is miraculous that we know that we are doing the right thing – what we were called to do – because the desire is so deep and so nagging and so insistent – that we won’t be satisfied until we accomplish it.  We are here to trust our own anointing – to push ourselves beyond the boundaries of where we wanted to give up.

The miracles in our lives say – yes we can.  Yes we can experience life the way that we want to experience it.  Now is the time for each one of us to realize that we have the power to be the good that we were called to be; and the miracles that we need are already here, waiting for us.

In the Bible Joseph survived to become a leader after his brothers sold him into slavery and told his father he was dead.  In Genesis, Joseph told his brothers, “you meant it for evil but God meant it for good.”  Those are the words of miracles.  Perhaps Strauss-Kahn’s evil will result in good.  Perhaps a nameless housekeeper will be able to achieve better dignity, respect and protection for many others in that industry.  And so, I say, let us become the housekeeper’s prayer.  Let us pray for those who serve us and for those of us who serve.  We need to believe today that we have the power and strength to overcome any challenge and defeat any outlaw.  Let us see ourselves winning as her – that witness in ourselves that lives to stand strong and be obedient to the Great Spirit.  Let us gird her with the inexhaustible supply of the universe deep within our souls and remember that we are divinely connected.
Let us summon the ancestors to right this wrong, to reveal any attacker as the criminal that he is and spare us from the arrogance of those who believe they are above the law.

Remember, this is our season.
This is our miracle.
This is the time for our own magic.

Namaste,

Reverend Cecilia Loving

About SPIRITMUV:  Spiritmuv® is a trans-denominational church, which means that it transcends the confines of religion and teaches unconditional love for one another regardless of race, creed, culture, or religion.   At the heart of its teachings is what Jesus taught — that we love one another, as well as the community that Mahatma Gandhi inspired when he said, “I am a Christian and a Muslim and a Hindu and a Jew.”  Reverend Cecilia Loving is the founder and creator of Spiritmuv, which was formed in 2007.   Services are held for an hour every Sunday, from 2:30 P.M. to 3:30 P.M. at the Unity Center of NYC, located at 213 West 58th Street.

Rev. Loving’s new book is now available God is Brown Girl Too, as well as Prayers for Those Standing in the Edge of Greatness.

Copyright 2011 by Cecilia Loving.
None of the content herein may be copied or otherwise used except with Reverend Loving’s written permission.

 

Join the Spiritmuv  Community
at
www.Spiritmuv.ning.com for special postings by Rev. Loving.

WHAT ARE YOU CALLING YOURSELF?

The rise of negative name-calling – not only in reference to other people but also to ourselves – made me raise a question that should be considered by everyone: what are you calling yourself?  So often we use words and phrases that are popular without considering what they mean.  How many people really internalize what they mean when they scream “I’m not worthy”?  Why does a woman who strives to be strong and independent call herself a “B-“?  Can ABC really succeed with a television show called “Good Christian B—s”?How can Kim, the blond housewife of Atlanta, call her assistant “b–h” – and even more questionable, how can the twenty-something black nanny/personal secretary answer such a call – without  protest?  What we are calling others is a reflection of what we call ourselves.  Profanity and phrases like “poor thing” and “poor me” are equally offensive.  We raise a ruckus over taking God‘s name in vain, but aren’t we temples of a living God?

We may not use the b-word, but we still blaspheme the kingdom of God within us if we call ourselves or our sisters and brothers less than what God is.   We still blaspheme the divine within if we undermine the unlimited power of God or fail to embrace Spirit’s inexhaustible supply.  Since we are the image and likeness of God everywhere present, we need to be careful about what we say about ourselves, as well as other people.  What name-calling ultimately boils down to is what we are affirming about the power in us.

In Luke 12:32, Jesus said, “It is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the Kingdom.”  But have your words provided the opening for your consciousness to receive the kingdom?  Have you used words to decree God’s good in every crack and crevice of your  life?  Or have you used nay-saying, negativity and nastiness to deny the existence of Absolute Good?  Are you speaking words that undermine or uplift your greatness?  Are you taking your divinity in vain?

Jesus says in Matthew 12:36 that you shall give an account on judgment day for every careless word that you utter.  But when is Judgment Day?  It’s every day.  It’s the period of reaping what you sow in thought, word and deed.  You do that every day.  Every day you choose whether to embrace a vibration of love or hatred.  Whatever you speak, you decree. If you talk about being poor, then you wallow in the energy of poverty; you decree it.  If you focus about illness, you create a connection to sickness – and inevitably, you decree it.  If you linger in the toxic vibrations of bad relationships, you give them life through your decree.  If you get stuck in the pity party of insecurity, loneliness or lack, you decree them in every word that you speak about them.

God is a Brown Girl Too decrees power.  It’s one of those books that are courageous enough to refute negativity and strife toshift the paradigm with a new story.  It dares new seeds to be planted in the vortex of unlimited possibility.   God speaks, saying “Quit pretending that you are less than your true worth.  Quit trying to play the universe with false bravado.  .  .  .  Now is the time for your own magic .  .  .  .  [I] did not give [you] a spirit of timidity or fear; but a spirit of power .  .  .  .  The sooner you recognize your power, the sooner you accomplish your goals, the sooner you step up to the plate and do what you were called here in this lifetime to do [and] make this world a better place.”

God says “There is power in your words.  Everyday declare what you want in your life.  Wake up and declare it.  Go to bed and declare it.  Stand up in your office and declare it.  Look out your window and declare it.  Walk down the street and declare it.  Your words are where you take responsibility for what you want to see manifest in your life .  .  .  .  [W]ords are fertile; they contain the essence of life – [I] travel through the breath of each spoken word.  The aborigines would say the tongue of Great Spirit resides in all things  .  .  .  . Power is your ability to celebrate who you are and what contribution you can make to this beautiful existence that you call life.  It gives you the honor to take charge of you.”

But you must be inventive enough to tell your truth – a truth that exudes love rather than fearful name-calling – a truth that praises rather than condemns, a truth that knows fortitude rather than failure, a truth that realizes victory rather than defeat, a truth that exudes courage rather than caution.

God says “Only those who do not know the truth would call themselves or any of my sons and daughters less than who they are.  I have given you the power that you need.  When you stand on my shoulders, your spiritual roots will reach down to the belly of the earth – without stopping there.Speak from the depths of your soul with boldness and conviction.  Reveal your awesome beauty.  Listen to what you are calling yourself.”

Namaste,

Reverend Cecilia Loving

About SPIRITMUV:  Spiritmuv® is a trans-denominational church, which means that it transcends the confines of religion and teaches unconditional love for one another regardless of race, creed, culture, or religion.   At the heart of its teachings is what Jesus taught — that we love one another, as well as the community that Mahatma Gandhi inspired when he said, “I am a Christian and a Muslim and a Hindu and a Jew.”  Reverend Cecilia Loving is the founder and creator of Spiritmuv, which was formed in 2007.  Services are held for an hour every Sunday, from 2:30 P.M. to 3:30 P.M. at the Unity Center of NYC, located at 213 West 58th Street.

WHERE IS YOUR GOLDEN VOICE? By Cecilia Loving

Ted Williams, “the man with the golden voice,” is teaching all of us something from his meteoric rise to fame.  Everyone seems to be holding their breath for his success.  We pray that he is redeemed from self-destruction because we don’t want an unhappy ending to this modern day miracle.  We pray that God will not only protect him from his own demons but also from the vultures that have lined up, patiently awaiting.

We’ve all been there before — perhaps not in Ted’s infamous shoes.  But when opportunity presented itself, there was something in us that longed to return to the cozy familiar.  Perhaps we resolved to change our lives forever, never to make the same mistakes again.   Perhaps we felt the fresh breath of triumph in our lungs and breathed it as long as we could — until we faltered and eventually needed the strength of something stronger than flesh.  Somewhere in the distance, we heard our golden voice but it seemed to fade, die out, or just not sound like us anymore. 

We were so eager for Ted Williams to tell our story that we summoned him from obscurity to speak with his golden voice.  We root for Ted because we are rooting for our own success.  He can do it — he can do it — he can do it!  Or if we are the negative sort, we moan that he’ll fail, he’s a con artist — or the most inspiring — once a drug addict always a drug addict.  We know that Ted needs help.  Gratefully, Dr. Phil has offered him at least 90 days of treatment at a remote rehabilitation facility.  But the real question is not what Ted is going to do, it is what are you going to do?  Where is your golden voice?  What talents are you allowing to go to waste?  What dreams do you need to dust off?  What resolutions have you made year after year that now lie buried on a journal page?

Ted Williams teaches us a few lessons about using our God-given talent.

First, the gifts that God blesses us with can survive the greatest storm.  Ted Williams had been at rock bottom, strung out on crack, addicted to alcohol and homeless.  But despite the odds, he still persevered and God sent him an angel.  A reporter from The Columbus Dispatch posted a 97-second clip of him on its website, holding a handwritten cardboard sign, which read I have the “God-given gift of voice.”

Second, God opens the doors that need to be opened.  The Columbus Dispatch video was posted to YouTube by an anonymous user.  Within 48 hours, the video went viral, receiving over 13 million page views.   This lead to numerous morning show appearances and potential job offers to do advertising, sporting events and even a potential spot on Oprah’s new OWN Network.

Third, if we don’t put God first, our good will disappear just as quickly as we receive it. Putting God first is a daily process.  It’s not something that we do once and never worry about again.  Salvation is not a one-time experience.  Salvation is an ongoing process.  Being tapped into and turned on to God is an everyday ritual of meditation, prayer, affirmation, study, and silence.  Williams showed us that if we don’t put God first, we will more easily revert back to our old ways.   (He got drunk and fought but hopefully will resist in the days to come.)

Fourth, Ted Williams is proof that we all have a golden voice.  We just need to use it.  By our “golden voice,” I don’t mean how we sound but the inner gifts that we each uniquely bear.  Ted’s children attempted to shame him by asking “where have you been?”  But that is the same question they need to be asking themselves.  We come not from our parents but through them to be the best that we can be.  The irony is that our challenges ultimately become our gifts.  We have the capacity to become better people because of them.

No one tells this story better than Wayne Dyer about his alcoholic father.  Dyer’s father abandoned his family and he and his siblings sometimes lived in foster homes.  But Dyer says that his father’s own dysfunction became his greatest teacher. “Growing up in Detroit orphanages I was immersed in opportunities to learn self-sufficiency at an early age,” Dyer says.  “Of course, so were all the other children around me. It’s just that I was already aware, by age 10, that whatever happened to me, my own destiny was right in my very own little hands and in nobody else’s.” 

Dyer says that true healing comes from making a conscious choice to “live your life based on the notion that there are no justified resentments.”  What a liberating concept: there are no justified resentments.  I do not have the right to be resentful against anyone or anything.  What I do have the right to do is to dance to my own music, create my own rhythm, find my own golden voice.  Dyer said that when he stood at his father’s grave, he didn’t curse him, he sent his father love — and in that instant, he was liberated.

Every day gives us an opportunity to heal and be restored in the righteousness of God.  There is no need to hold onto the past; or worry about what we did or didn’t do.  There comes a time when we have to shake the dust off our feet, and keep on moving.

We send you love Ted Williams.  We know you have been the best that you had the capacity to be under the circumstances.  Now, we pray for you to put on a new self.

No matter what, we are glad that we heard your golden voice.  You are living proof that this is our season.  We are taking shape and creating form in the cosmic ethers like fresh seed falling on new earth.  Just like in the Garden of Eden, the true manna of God Source is all around us.  Thank you for reminding us that we each have the gift to listen to God and to hear a golden voice inside of us.  Perhaps it is singing “I ain’t gonna study war no more.”  Perhaps it is testifying, “I’m gonna touch the hem of Jesus’ garment.”  Perhaps it is praying,  “I’m gonna rise like Lazarus.”  It doesn’t matter.  The most important thing is that we listen, and hear ourselves taking charge in a new way.

Namaste,

Reverend Cecilia Loving

About SPIRITMUV:  Spiritmuv® is a trans-denominational church, which means that it transcends the confines of religion and teaches unconditional love for one another regardless of race, creed, culture, or religion.   At the heart of its teachings is what Jesus taught — that we love one another, as well as the community that Mahatma Ghandi inspired when he said, “I am a Christian and a Muslim and a Hindu and a Jew.”  Reverend Cecilia Loving is the founder and creator of Spiritmuv, which was formed in 2007.  Services are held for an hour every Sunday, from 2:30 P.M. to 3:30 P.M. at the Unity Center of NYC, located at 213 West 58th Street.

Rev. Loving, author of Prayers for Those Standing in the Edge of Greatness, is the sole owner, creator and administrator of God is a Brown Girl Too®, which holds annual retreats and workshops.  The next God is a Brown Girl Too Retreat will be held April 1-3, 2011, at the Mariandale Retreat and Conference Center.

None of the content herein may be copied or otherwise used except with Reverend Loving’s written permission.

Join the Spiritmuv  Community at www.Spiritmuv.ning.com for special postings by Rev. Loving.

GOD IS A BROWN GIRL TOO® 

“CREATING  BEYOND THE  BOX  OF CONVENTIONALITY ” RETREAT
will take place in the Spring of 2011
from April 1 at 5:00 P.M. through April 3 at 1:00 P.M. 

Don’t miss this wonderful opportunity to enjoy the peace, serenity and creative consciousness of a like-minded group of women of color at the Mariandale Retreat and Conference Center, located at 299 North Highland Avenue, in Ossining, New York.   All rooms are single and surrounded by the loving prayers of the Dominican Sisters who own the facility.   

 The cost of the entire weekend, including rooms, workshops and three delicious meals per day, is only $450.00.  There is a $100 discount for senior citizens, so seniors pay $350.00. 

 Registration has already begun at http://www.godisabrowngirltoo.com/or you can mail payment directly to God is a Brown Girl Too, 376 President Street Unit 2H, Brooklyn, New York 11231.  But act fast because rooms are sellling and there are now only 13 rooms left.

NOT JUST FOR COLORED GIRLS ONLY By Cecilia Loving

For Colored Girls FourTyler Perry’s superb resurrection of Ntozake Shange’s For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf reminds us that its message is not just for colored girls.  It is a lesson for all of us — that God is not merely in us, but God is the divine energy that keeps co-creating as us, that part of us that  continues to be transformed by the Spirit revealing pure possibility as us.  No matter what our challenges are, we are not here in this experience that we call “life” to just go through the motions.  We are not just here to flirt with life but to be better than ourselves by allowing God to use us.

So what is holding us back?  Are we — like Ntozake Shange wrote — “half notes scattered without rhythm/no tune”?  Are we “distraught laughter fallin’ over our shoulder”?  Are “we whispering don’t tell nobody?  don’t tell a soul — because we [just] dancing on beer can and shingles”? Do we even realize that the Love of God embraces us with a joy that runs from the bottom of our feet to the top of our heads?  Do we even know that the magnitude of God radiates through us as the glorious light of truth and the everlasting energy of divine ideas?

In the Book of Matthew, the 6th Chapter, the 8th Verse, it says that God knows what we have need of before we even ask.  The good that we seek is already part of the endless energy of God.  The only person standing in the way of that good is us — when we give our power away to people and events and the appearances of stuff.

As Loretta Divine, the Lady in Green from Perry’s For Colored Girls movie, says “somebody almost walked off with alla my stuff — not my poems or a dance i gave up in the street — but somebody almost walked off wid alla my stuff — like a kleptomaniac workin hard and forgettin while stealin — this is mine!  this ain’t your stuff!”  The question that Ntozake so ingeniously raises is how do we keep our stuff — and baptize it in the Spirit and fill it with the Holy Ghost power of who we are — so that we can grow and soar as a divine expression of God?

I believe that Thandi Newton, the Lady in Yellow in Perry’s For Colored Girls, hits it on the head when she says: “bein alive & bein a woman [and I add bein’ a man] & bein colored is a metaphysical dilemma i haven’t quite conquered yet/ do you see the point that my spirit is too ancient to understand the separation of soul & gender…”  Our spirits are too ancient to understand that we can’t drag around misery.  That doesn’t belong to us.  We can’t give our power to being victims.  That ain’t good enough for us.  We can’t worry about what somebody -sposed to be doin.’  That’s too toxic for us.   We have to realize that who we are in the flesh is a compliment to who we are in the Spirit.  We have to recognize that we are the good in everything that we experience.

We need to breathe good into everything and everyone just like the sugar that you put in something to make it sweet.  We need  to sweeten our consciousness.  The difference with spiritual sweetness or goodness is that it doesn’t backfire with excess calories or fat or diabetes.  It is all good for this reason: you will get out of everything what you put into it.  So we are going to make a conscious effort to put good into every situation.  The metaphysical dilemma, you see, is that someone else has painted us as weak, when we are strong.  Someone else has painted us as less than, when we are more than worthy.  Someone else claims to have the power when the power is in God.

We need to keep our mind stayed on God and move on.  The Lady in Blue from For Colored Girls says: “one thing i don’t need is any more apologies.  i got sorry greeting me at my front door.  you can keep yours . . . iI can’t get to the clothes in my closet for alla the sorries . . . .i’m gonna do exactly what i want to & i won’t be sorry for none of it.”  In other words,  I am not about wrath.  I am not about vengeance.  I am not about regret.  I am not about holding onto who you are in consciousness because I am liberating, freeing, empowering who I am in the Spirit — and I am not sorry for any of it.   Because when I can’t release your crap, it becomes my crap. I am bigger than you — the hell in you, the craziness in you, the disrespect in you!  So, here’s what I’m gonna do:  I am going to forgive all of your nonsense seventy times seven, and I’m going let it go.

We need to radiate the love within.  For Colored Girls demonstrates something very important — that the love that each one of the women needed, they had within.  They said — “my love is too beautiful to have thrown back in my face; my love is too sanctified to have thrown back in my face; my love is too magic to have thrown back in my face; my love is too music to have thrown back in my face.”  We relate to love on a human level — based on what we give and receive.  But on a spiritual level, love is not giving or receiving — love  simply is.  We evolve in it.  We create out of it.  We are reborn in it.  We are sanctified by it.  We are saved as it.  Love is the only  salvation that there is.  It doesn’t worry about receiving because it is constantly giving.  It doesn’t worry about giving because it is always being blessed.  There is nothing that it needs or lacks because Love is divine source.

We need to praise our power.  Prayer works because it realizes that its deliverance is part of the divine order of the universe.  Prayer works because it is not simply us speaking, it is Absolute Good.  As soon as we ask, we begin the process of receiving.  The only way that we shut the door — is by not believing.  When we give praise and thanks for the manifestation of our good, then we allow it to take shape.

What people rarely focus on in For Colored Girls is that at the end of the play, it says “& for this is for colored girls who have considered suicide/ BUT are moving to the ends of their own rainbows.” (Emphasis Added.)  You see, they are not tragically ending life but have come to the realization that they are the covenant between humanity and God — all the colors of the rainbow.  When we realize that we can breathe good into everything; when we know that nobody has the power to walk off with all of our stuff;  when we radiate the love within;  when we praise our power — we watch life give shape to us — a more spectacular us than we could ever imagine.  And then, only then can we say —  “i found god in myself, and i loved her[/him] fiercely.”

 i saw good radiating from me like endless streams of light bouncing off the edge of all possibility.
just as my stuff was about to walk off, i realized that it was mine, and i claimed it!
i began again and witnessed my own love as the ultimate salvation.
and just as i was about to give up, i saw prayers swinging from trees and heard blessings break branches and scatter to the wind, answering everyone and everything, saying nothing is impossible.

 i moved to the end of my rainbow, and i was born again!  

Namaste,

Reverend Cecilia Loving

About SPIRITMUV:  Spiritmuv® is a trans-denominational church, which means that it transcends the confines of religion and teaches unconditional love for one another regardless of race, creed, culture, or religion.   At the heart of its teachings is what Jesus taught — that we love one another, as well as the community that Mahatma Gandhi inspired when he said, “I am a Christian and a Muslim and a Hindu and a Jew.”  Reverend Cecilia Loving is the founder and creator of Spiritmuv, which was formed in 2007.  Services are held for an hour every Sunday, from 2:30 P.M. to 3:30 P.M. at the Unity Center of NYC, located at 213 West 58th Street.

Rev. Loving, author of Prayers for Those Standing in the Edge of Greatness, is the sole owner, creator and administrator of God is a Brown Girl Too®, which holds annual retreats and workshops.  The next God is a Brown Girl Too Retreat will be held April 1-3, 2011, at the Mariandale Retreat and Conference Center.

None of the content herein may be copied or otherwise used except with Reverend Loving’s written permission.

 

Join the Spiritmuv  Community at www.Spiritmuv.ning.com for special postings by Rev. Loving.

GOD IS A BROWN GIRL TOO® 

“CREATING  BEYOND THE  BOX  OF CONVENTIONALITY ” RETREAT
will take place in the Spring of 2011
from April 1 at 5:00 P.M. through April 3 at 1:00 P.M. 

Don’t miss this wonderful opportunity to enjoy the peace, serenity and creative consciousness of a like-minded group of women of color at the Mariandale Retreat and Conference Center, located at 299 North Highland Avenue, in Ossining, New York.   All rooms are single and surrounded by the loving prayers of the Dominican Sisters who own the facility. 

 The cost of the entire weekend, including rooms, workshops and three delicious meals per day, is only $450.00.  There is a $100 discount for senior citizens, so seniors pay $350.00. 

 Registration has already begun at http://www.godisabrowngirltoo.com/or you can mail payment directly to God is a Brown Girl Too, 376 President Street Unit 2H, Brooklyn, New York 11231.  But act fast because rooms are selling and there are now only 13 rooms left.

 

GET YOUR HOUSE IN ORDER By Cecilia Loving

There’s a lot of discussion these days on the controversy surrounding Bishop Eddie Long, senior pastor of New Birth Missionary Baptist Church,  who has been accused in a series of civil lawsuits of sexual misconduct with young male parishioners.   Although Bishop Long — revered husband and father of four — vowed from the pulpit to thousands of supportive congregants that he would contest the accusations, his battle seems lost before it could ever possibly be won.

According to court papers, Bishop Long engaged in private ceremonies to consecrate his “Spiritual Sons” where via candlelight, they exchanged vows while Long covenanted that he — spiritual Father — would protect them forever.  Long’s Longfellow Youth Academy supposedly trained young men to love, lead and proceed on their “masculine journey” through commitment, leadership and integrity, but it sounds more like a inner sanctum created to satisfy Long’s fleshly desires.  Long’s spandex-wearing photographs, emailed to his accusers’ cell phones, would probably be Exhibit A in establishing the type of misconduct punishable by criminal laws in states that have discerned the need to protect congregants from their own clergy’s antics.

Unfortunately, allegations of clergy sexual misconduct are not new.  The potential for abuse of power and betrayal of trust is so prevalent that a “mega church” would be foolish not to create adequate safeguards — like educating clergy and congregation on the law,  raising awareness of potential for abuse; providing mechanisms for reporting misconduct, including the investigation of complaints and sufficient response mechanisms; as well as dedicating therapeutic systems to re-build trust in the event of malfeasance.  Otherwise, the church inadvertently sanctions the hatred, violence, abuse, and destruction it should exist to condemn.  Jamal Parris’ complaint against Long, New Birth and Longfellow lists the people at the church who knew that he shared a bedroom with the Bishop.

The unraveling of Bishop Long is not just about problems inherent in black churches.  It is about the responsibility of churches, clergy, congregants, and people everywhere to get their houses in order.  There is a reason why the states of Minnesota, Alaska, Colorado, North Dakota, Texas, and Utah have criminals statutes to prevent clergy from engaging in sexual acts while giving spiritual counsel.   These rules are not limited to black folks, they are for clergy of all colors and all faiths because of an ongoing abuse of authority.  When God’s shepherd is shrouded with both the glorification of his pastoral position and the celebrity of his church, there is an even greater potential for not only his abuse, but also his flock’s acquiescence.  Sadly, most of us are star-struck.  Self-proclaimed Christians seem to ignore most of the commandments, even the one where God says have no other idols before me.

This case is hardly just about gay rights.  In 2004, Long led a march to Martin Luther King Jr.’s grave site in support of a Georgia constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage.   Like many “Christians,” he speaks out against homosexuality — completely dismissing the fact that Jesus said love one another.  But gay rights pertains to sex between consenting adults.  This isn’t a case where Bishop Long simply engaged in a sexual relationship with a consenting male companion from — let’s say another church.  Long’s hand-picked disciples from the Longfellow Youth Academy could hardly be said to “consent.”  Many courts do not even allow “consent” as a defense to what is clearly a breach of “the punctilio of an honor the most sensitive” — the fiduciary duty of a church to protect the  pastor’s flock from everyone, even himself.

This case is much deeper than sex.  Sadly, it is about greed and grandiose power gone astray in what supposedly began as a spiritual ascension of faith.  If the allegations are true, Eddie Long is a mirror of what goes wrong with each and every one of us when we stop being true to God.  I would not be surprised if he, too, was the subject of abuse — years before he ascended to the throne.  It may be that his entire life has been one of pain that he never adequately dealt with and instead inflicted upon others.  When we say we believe in God but our practice is inconsistent, we are bound to come face to face with our own demons, eventually.   I don’t say this while sitting on some self-proclaimed high horse either.  I don’t believe that anyone in the flesh is capable of casting stones at a sinner.

In the 69th Psalm, the Psalmist said “O God, You know my foolishness; and my sins are not hidden from You. . . . Shame has covered my face.  I have become a stranger to my brothers, and an alien to my mother’s children; because zeal for Your house has eaten me up.”

Jesus demonstrated this holy zeal when He cleaned out the temple.  John, Chapter 2 says Jesus found  those who sold oxen and sheep and doves, and the money changers doing business there — and he made a whip of cords.  He drove all of them out of the temple,  overturned the tables, and screamed “Take these things away! Do not make My Father’s house a house of merchandise!” Then, His disciples remembered what the Psalmist said, “Zeal for Your house has eaten Me up.”   God’s cleansing power goes deep into the veins and the inner parts for true confession.

Jesus knew the Holy Ghost so well that he said “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.” (John 2:13-22)  We think that Jesus is talking about the church, but he was talking about the temple of his body.  He was saying his body vessel of muscle and bones and nerves and skin is just an outer garment.  His persona, position and title was just the human temple.  He existed for the greater mission of being resurrected in the Spirit.  He came to teach us that we, too, are governed by a Holy Ghost power that is greater than what you see in the flesh — a presence so powerful that it is in us — a Spirit of Truth to teach us all things, as our counselor, our teacher, and our guide.

Jesus  came to show us that Zeal — the pure presence of God — holds us accountable for our stuff regardless of  where we are on the path or what we have manifested for ourselves  —  whether we have a mega church or an infant church; whether we just go the park and have silent walk on Sundays; whether we practice yoga on a mat or run in the street; whether we sleep in or have brunch — it doesn’t matter.  We are accountable for our behavior — for anything that we do that is inconsistent with Spirit.

We try to fool ourselves, but the truth is that no matter how holy you profess to be — abuse and God don’t live in the same house.  Hatred and God don’t live in the same house.  Hatred includes homophobia, sexism, racism — and all of the other -isms.  Lies and God don’t live in the same house.  Cheating and God don’t live in the same house.  Jealousy and God don’t live in the same house.  Resentment and God don’t live in the same house.  Idols and God don’t live in the same house.

When we find these things present in our consciousness, we have to step up to the plate and correct our wrong.  It doesn’t matter whether we are Christian, Buddhist, Jewish, Hindu, Taoist , Muslim, Nondenominational, or Atheist  — the zeal of God’s house will “eat up” anything that is not in alignment with Spirit.  We cannot hide from it — under neither the masquerade of redeemed saint nor the cloak of skeptical nonbeliever.  We will always be held accountable.

Spiritual leaders  need to get their houses in order.  Teachers need to get their houses in order.  Politicians need to get their lives in order.  Corporate executives need to get their lives in order.  Churches and their parishioners need to get their lives in order.  We all need to clean out our temples so well that we become so honest and forthright — that only God remains.

I always try to see a blessing in the appearance of destruction, knowing that the lesson of redemption is  not just for the accused, it holds truth for us all.  Here, one blessing is a reminder of the cleansing power of God.

We need to do our own self-inventory and make sure that we are acting with commitment, leadership and integrity.  We need to be honest with ourselves.  There may be some lies that we don’t want to come terms with.  There may even be some bones that we need to shake out of our closets.  We have to stop trying to fool ourselves.  Our loved ones and friends need to stop trying to look the other way.  We need to stop trying to hold onto the past.  We have to stop giving our power to people or relationships or situations that are toxic.  We can no longer get stuck in the mire of bad habits, abusive appetites, or somebody else’s stuff.  We need to clean out the contradictions that undermine our faith; and we need to remain vigilant to destroy any ousted enemy that tries to sneak back through our thoughts, words or deeds.

Otherwise, we may not find ourselves on CNN or the Tom Joiner Radio Show defending our dirty laundry, but we will wake up one morning and our mess will be piled so high that we can’t even step over it.  We will be forced to finally see what’s there, and hopefully we will come face to face — not with our demons — but with our everlasting love for God — an earth-shattering zeal lashing out from the universal ethers — to do nothing more than get our house in order.

Namaste,

Reverend Cecilia Loving

About SPIRITMUV:  Spiritmuv® is a trans-denominational church, which means that it transcends the confines of religion and teaches unconditional love for one another regardless of race, creed, culture, or religion.   At the heart of its teachings is what Jesus taught — that we love one another, as well as the community that Mahatma Ghandi inspired when he said, “I am a Christian and a Muslim and a Hindu and a Jew.”  Reverend Cecilia Loving is the founder and creator of Spiritmuv, which was formed in 2007.  Services are held for an hour every Sunday, from 2:30 P.M. to 3:30 P.M. at the Unity Center of NYC, located at 213 West 58th Street.

Rev. Loving, author of Prayers for Those Standing in the Edge of Greatness, is the sole owner, creator and administrator of God is a Brown Girl Too®, which holds annual retreats and workshops.  The next God is a Brown Girl Too Retreat will be held April 1-3, 2011, at the Mariandale Retreat and Conference Center.

None of the content herein may be copied or otherwise used except with Reverend Loving’s written permission.

 

Join the Spiritmuv  Community at www.Spiritmuv.ning.com for special postings by Rev. Loving.

GOD IS A BROWN GIRL TOO® 

“CREATING  BEYOND THE  BOX  OF CONVENTIONALITY ” RETREAT
will take place in the Spring of 2011
from April 1 at 5:00 P.M. through April 3 at 1:00 P.M. 

Don’t miss this wonderful opportunity to enjoy the peace, serenity and creative consciousness of a like-minded group of women of color at the Mariandale Retreat and Conference Center, located at 299 North Highland Avenue, in Ossining, New York.   All rooms are single and surrounded by the loving prayers of the Dominican Sisters who own the facility. 

The cost of the entire weekend, including rooms, workshops and three delicious meals per day, is only $450.00.  There is a $100 discount for senior citizens, so seniors pay $350.00. 

 Registration has already begun at http://www.godisabrowngirltoo.com/or you can mail payment directly to God is a Brown Girl Too, 376 President Street Unit 2H, Brooklyn, New York 11231.  But act fast because rooms are selling and there are now only 11 rooms left.